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Artist or CreatorDavid Low (1891-1963)
Title or CaptionLow's Topical Budget
Extent1 item
Published byEvening Standard
Date05 May 1934
FormatNewspaper
Embedded text or transcriptLow's Topical Budget Lot 3 Lot 165 Lot 359 The Opening of The Royal Academy
enables us to see at last how the nation has come through the depression. On the whole the
gents seem to have borne up better than the ladies. Lot 179 Lot 454 Lot 124 Covent Garden
Opera - Season opens brilliantly. Beecham conducts the audience, which is in rare voice,
with his usual delicacy. Shut up! Don't interrupt. Picture of the Year - Mussolini
resisting bones. (Pardon us a moment, reader, while Scotland Yard dashes across this
cartoon. Word has just reached Low from his head spy that Public Friend No. 1 is in town.
More of this anon.) India - Windhi sees peanut. From our political correspondent. Mahatma
Windhi saw the Prime Peanut to-day to protest against the decision of the Magic Circle that
the Indian Rope Trick was a myth. He said he had a rope all ready and if the Government was
not afraid to climb it, he would make the whole lot of the[m] disappear or bust. No. 10
Turkish Bath Fragment. Gad, sir, Lord Beaverbrook is right. Everyone should protest against
the Socialism of the Government by refusing to have anything to do with the Post Office,
the B.B.C. or the sewers.
Person DepictedBeecham; Thomas (1879-1961); Sir
Churchill; Winston (1874-1965)
Low; David (1891-1963)
Colonel Blimp; (fictional)
Musso; (Low's dog)
NotesNews: The Times 4/5/1934 Royal Academy Banquet - New Experiments in Art - A Helping
Hand to Industry. The annual banquet of the Royal Academy of Art in celebration of the
opening of the 6th Summer Exhibition was held at Burlington House last night. Bad Manners
at the Opera - To the editor of The Times - Sir - The correct demeanour of the Wagner
audience which attended the opening performance of the "Ring" might lead one to suppose
that Sir Thomas Beecham's widely welcomed rebuke had resulted in remedying for ever a
condition of affairs which has prevailed for a very long time. This, however, is not likely
to prove the case. Sir Thomas has applied a cure, but he has not dealt preventively with
the cause. The cause lies in the practice of performing in theatres non-relevant music
either before the rise of the first curtain or during entr'actes. Such performances are not
intended as an invitation to chatter, but they have the effect of inducing converstation
which, were it indulged in during a performance of the very same music in a concert hall
would not for one moment be tolerated.
SubjectsAnimals
BBC
Baths
Behaviour
CID
Covent Garden Market
Espionage
Exhibitions
Historical periods and persons
Independence
India
International relations
Music
Performance
Philosophies
Police
Royal Academy of Art
Royal mail
Scotland Yard
Social attitudes
Spectators
Turkish baths
UK
art
broadcasting
campaigns
conductors
dogs
economic depression
economics
etiquette
foreign policy
government departments
health
indian rope tricks
magicians
monkeys
opera
orchestras
paintings
portraits
protests
railway stations
singers
socialism
SeriesLow's topical budget
Copyright contact detailsNorthcliffe House, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5TT solo@solosyndication.com
Fax: 02075660388
Relates to cartoonDL0820

Show related Persons records.

Persons
CodePersonNameDatesAboutMultimediaImage
GB/BCA/98Beecham; Thomas (1879-1961); Sir1879-1961   
GB/BCA/7Churchill; Winston (1874-1965)1874-1965British politician. Became a Conservative MP in 1900 and held the offices of President of the Board of Trade, Home Secretary, First Lord of the Admiralty, Chancellor of the Exchequer eventually becoming Prime Minister from 1940-1945 and from 1951-1955. A noted statesman and orator, he was also an officer in the British Army, an historian, writer and artist.  
GB/BCA/1Low; David (1891-1963)1891-1963   
GB/BCA/173Colonel Blimp; (fictional)   
GB/BCA/2400Musso; (Low's dog)   
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